HOLOGRAPHIC DREAMS, Within the Mouth of the Deep, ~ Iona Miller

 

Our dreams, as well as our corporeal being have roots in a holographic cosmos. This is reflected in the holographic nature of our brains and the processing of underlying information encoded holographically within everything. Dreams are phenomenological. Jung thought they arise from the collective unconscious with an ability to transmit symbolic information to the waking psyche. We now know they help us incorporate new experience and consolidate long-term memory. They encourage brain plasticity and gene expression. Archetypes play a role in the unfolding of imagery and in the emergence of the Self and transcendent function, which can appear in an initiatory or healing capacity. Physical body symptoms, addictions, family and relationship problems, group conflicts and social tensions are mirrored in our night time dreams, and vice versa. All these experiences, even the most chaotic-seeming processes, when approached openly, reveal an inner order and coherence from the ‘holographic blur’ that provides new information vital for our personal and collective growth. Dreams are a form of gnosis, knowledge through direct experience, making them of interest in both Consciousness Studies and Physics. Process work integrates concepts from physics, psychology, anthropology, shamanism, and spirituality into a paradigm and methodology with applications in many fields. It helps us build deeper relationships with our dreams and unconscious. New myths grow in our dreams. http://ionamiller.weebly.com

The holographic paradigm is a theory based on the work of David Bohm and Karl Pribram and extrapolated from two ideas:

That the universe is in some sense a holographic structure — proposed by David Bohm
That consciousness is dependent on holographic structure — proposed by Karl Pribram
This paradigm posits that theories using holographic structures may lead to a unified understanding of consciousness and the universe.

The holographic paradigm is rooted in the concept that all organisms and forms are holograms embedded within a universal hologram, which physicist David Bohm[1] called the holomovement. It is an extrapolation of the optical discovery of 2-dimensional holograms by Dennis Gabor in 1947.[2] Holography created an explosion of scientific and industrial interest starting in 1948.

Engineer Thomas Bearden describes holograms as:

photographic recordings of the patterns of interference between coherent light reflected from the object of interest, and light that comes directly from the same source or is reflected by a mirror. When this photo image is illuminated from behind by coherent light, a three-dimensional image of the object appears in space. The characteristic of a hypothetically perfect hologram is that all its content is contained in any finite part of itself (at lower resolution). [3]

In 1973, what has come to be known as the Pribram-Bohm Holographic Model was non-existent. But the Seattle thinktank, Organization for the Advancement of Knowledge (OAK), led by Richard Alan Miller and Burt Webb, were able to synthesize the work of Northrup and Burr on the electromagnetic nature of the human being with Dennis Gabor’s work on optical holograms and come up with a new notion – a holographic paradigm.

In Languages of the Brain (1971), Pribram[4] had postulated that 2-dimensional interference patterns, physical holograms, underlie all thinking. The holographic component, for him, represented the associative mechanisms and contributed to memory retrieval and storage and problem solving.

However, Miller, Webb and Dickson extrapolated that the holographic metaphor extends to n-dimensions and therefore constitutes a fundamental description of the universe and our electromagnetic embedding within that greater field. It suggested the human energy body or bioenergetics was more fundamental than the biochemical domain.

The “Holographic Concept of Reality” (1973)[5] was presented at the 1st Psychotronic Conference in Prague in 1973, and later published by Gordon & Breach in 1975, and again in 1979 in Psychoenergetic Systems: the Interaction of Consciousness, Energy and Matter, edited by Dr. Stanley Krippner.

Miller and Webb followed up their ground-breaking paper with “Embryonic Holography,”[6] which was also presented at the Omniversal Symposium at California State College at Sonoma, hosted by Dr. Stanley Krippner, September 29, 1973. Arguably, this is the first paper to address the quantum biological properties of human beings—the first illustrations of the sources of quantum mindbody.

The organization of any biological system is established by a complex electrodynamic field which is, in part, determined by its atomic physiochemical components. This field, in turn, determines the behavior and orientation of these components. This dynamic is mediated through wave-based genomes wherein DNA functions as the holographic projector of the psychophysical system – a quantum biohologram.

Dropping a level of observation below quantum biochemistry and conventional biophysics, this holographic paradigm proposes that a biohologram determines the development of the human embryo; that we are a quantum bodymind with consciousness informing the whole process through the level of information. They postulated DNA as the possible holographic projector of the biohologram, patterning the three-dimensional electromagnetic standing and moving wave front that constitutes our psychophysical being—quantum bioholography.

The Gariaev (Garyaev) group (1994)[7] has proposed a theory of the Wave-based Genome where the DNA-wave functions as a Biocomputer. They suggest (1) that there are genetic “texts”, similar to natural context-dependent texts in human language; (2) that the chromosome apparatus acts simultaneously both as a source and receiver of these genetic texts, respectively decoding and encoding them; (3) that the chromosome continuum acts like a dynamical holographic grating, which displays or transduces weak laser light and solitonic electro-acoustic fields.[8]

The distribution of the character frequency in genetic texts is fractal, so the nucleotides of DNA molecules are able to form holographic pre-images of biostructures. This process of “reading and writing” the very matter of our being manifests from the genome’s associative holographic memory in conjunction with its quantum nonlocality. Rapid transmission of genetic information and gene-expression unite the organism as holistic entity embedded in the larger Whole. The system works as a biocomputer—a wave biocomputer.[9][10]

source:

http://ionamiller.weebly.com/helix-to-holgram.html

Reblogged with the kind permission of Iona Miller